Richard Einhorn

Richard Einhorn

Richard Einhorn's unique music has been described as "hauntingly beautiful", "sensational", and "overwhelming in its emotional power". He is one of a small handful of composers who not only reaches a large, world-wide audience, but whose music receives widespread critical praise for its integrity, emotional depth, and craft. Richard Einhorn’s Voices of Light, described as an "opera with silent film" has been hailed as "a great masterpiece of contemporary music" and "a work of meticulous genius". The piece has been performed over 230 times, selling out such venues as the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival; Avery Fisher Hall; Kennedy Center (with the National Symphony); Disney Hall in Los Angeles (with the Los Angeles Master Chorale and Grant Gershon); the Esplanade in Singapore; the Barbican (with the London Symphony and Marin Alsop); and the Sydney Opera House in Australia. The Sony Classical CD of Voices of Light, featuring the vocal group Anonymous 4, was a Billboard classical bestseller, earning Einhorn the distinction of being one of only a few living composers to have made "the charts". Voices of Light has attracted national media attention including articles in the Wall Street Journal, segments on All Things Considered and Performance Today, and an extended profile on CBS television network's magazine show, CBS Sunday Morning. Einhorn has written opera, orchestral and chamber music, song cycles, multimedia events, film music, and dance scores. The wildly popular Red Angels for New York City Ballet, with choreography by Ulysses Dove, was featured on Live From Lincoln Center on PBS and is in the New York City Ballet’s permanent repertory. The Shooting Gallery, a multimedia collaboration with filmmaker Bill Morrison premiered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival. Einhorn’s 90-minute oratorio about Charles Darwin, The Origin (original films by Bill Morrison), was broadcast in its entirety by WCNY-TV in Syracuse, NY, and received its European premiere at Die Glocke in Bremen, German. Other notable works include The Spires, The City, The Field, a 9/11 memorial premiered by the Albany Symphony under David Allan Miller; A Carnival of Miracles, commissioned by Anonymous 4 and premiered to a sold-out crowd at New Sounds Live; and My Many Colored Days, an orchestral commission from the Minnesota Orchestra. Upcoming projects include HeLa, a multimedia work for orchestra and film in celebration of Henrietta Lacks, and a piece for Trio 180. Richard Einhorn’s extensive film music catalog includes scores for the Academy Award-winning documentary short Educating Peter (HBO); Arthur Penn's thriller Dead of Winter starring Mary Steenburgen (MGM); and Fire-Eater directed by Pirjo Honkasalo, for which Einhorn won the Jussi (Finnish Academy Award) for Best Musical Score.

Born in 1952, Richard Einhorn graduated summa cum laude in music from Columbia University, where he studied with, among others, Vladimir Ussachevsky, Jack Beeson, and Mario Davidovsky. Before turning his attention exclusively to composition, Einhorn worked as a record producer for such artists as Meredith Monk, the New York Philharmonic, and the Philadelphia Orchestra. His production of the Bach Cello Suites with Yo-Yo Mawon a Grammy for Best Instrumental Performance. Einhorn has received numerous awards and grants from Meet the Composer, NYSCA, NEA, the New York State Music Fund, and many others. He is a well-known advocate for persons with serious hearing losses. He lives in New York with his daughter Miranda and wife Amy Singer.


Julia Cooke

Julia Cooke

Julia Cooke was named Executive Director of Baltimore Concert Opera in 2012, after having been a founding member of the board. Prior to her career as an opera executive, Julia maintained active performing and teaching careers. She performed many leading soprano roles, in Faust, Die Zauberflöte, Don Giovanni, Falstaff, and Dialogues of the Carmelites among others. Companies included Baltimore Opera, Sarasota Opera, and L’Opera Piccola. On the concert stage, Ms. Cooke made her Avery Fisher Hall debut in 2009 as the soprano soloist in Carmina Burana, other highlights included appearances with Anchorage Symphony, Maryland Symphony, York Symphony, Rhode Island Civic Chorale and Orchestra, and Long Bay Symphony. Honors included being a District Winner in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Awards, and Regional Winner of the MacAllister Awards. Ms. Cooke holds a Master of Music degree in opera from Indiana University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in music and psychology from the University of Rochester. Julia was an adjunct professor of voice at Towson University and Morgan State University, in addition to her several years of teaching young people with the Chicago Children’s Choir, and Maryland State Boychoir.


Jonathan Palevsky

Jonathan Palevsky

Jonathan Palevsky is the Program Director at WBJC, Maryland's Classical Music Station (91.5 FM). He has worked for the station since 1986 when he became a part-time announcer, and became the station’s Program Director in 1990. Originally from Montreal, Jonathan Palevsky came to Baltimore in 1982 to study classical guitar at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University. 


Judah Adashi

Judah Adashi

The music of composer Judah Adashi (b. 1975), grounded in the classical tradition and imbued with soul and pop influences ranging from Nina Simone to Björk, has been described as “beguiling” (Alex Ross, New Yorker), “elegant” (Steve Smith, Boston Globe), and “impassioned” (Will Robin, Bandcamp). He has been honored with awards, grants and commissions from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the ASCAP and BMI Foundations, the American Composers Forum, New Music USA and the Aspen Music Festival, as well as residencies at Yaddo and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Among Dr. Adashi’s recent works is Rise, a collaboration with the poet Tameka Cage Conley. The forty-minute piece for double choir and chamber ensemble, which bears witness to America’s fraught civil rights journey from Selma to Ferguson and beyond, was praised for its “strong words [and] clear music” (Anne Midgette, Washington Post). The work’s opening movement was recorded and released in May 2015, with all proceeds going to the family of Freddie Gray, the young black man whose death while in police custody sparked the Baltimore Uprising.

As an organizer committed to creating meaningful contexts for 21st century classical music, Dr. Adashi is the founder and artistic director of the Evolution Contemporary Music Series, noted for having “elevated and enriched Baltimore’s new music scene enormously” (Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun). The series has made Baltimore a destination for extraordinary new music and musicians since 2005. In the words of the Washington Post’s Tim Page: "To live in Baltimore is to live in a perpetual state of surprise, and the marvelous and venturesome Evolution Series adds smart new music to the mix…for those of us who remember downtown New York in the 1970s, it is reassuring to find something very much like it happening in Baltimore now."

Passionate about introducing students to new music and empowering Baltimore’s youngest artists to make their own, Dr. Adashi has been a member of the composition and music theory faculty at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University since 2002. In addition to teaching composition lessons and courses in contemporary music, he also directs Junior Bach, a one-on-one mentoring program in composition for students in Baltimore schools, culminating each semester in a concert of their original music. Junior Bach alumnus Tariq Al-Sabir calls the program “a catalyst for growth, not only in music but in life…it taught me how to connect the music in my head to the music on paper and in the concert hall.”

Dr. Adashi holds master’s and doctoral degrees from Peabody, and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University. He lives in Baltimore’s Federal Hill neighborhood with his fiancée and frequent collaborator, cellist Lavena Johanson.